high school – Coach Factory Outlets 2014 http://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 10:00:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png high school – Coach Factory Outlets 2014 http://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/ 32 32 SEPTA’s Wayne Junction Makeover Brings Changes to Germantown https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/septas-wayne-junction-makeover-brings-changes-to-germantown/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 10:00:39 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/septas-wayne-junction-makeover-brings-changes-to-germantown/ From a new third-floor apartment flooded with natural light, developer Ken Weinstein looked to the catalyst for the 1902 Germantown factory renovation: the buff stone SEPTA Wayne Junction station a block away. . “Imagine being able to roll out of bed, hop on the train, and be downtown in minutes, to jobs in the area […]]]>

From a new third-floor apartment flooded with natural light, developer Ken Weinstein looked to the catalyst for the 1902 Germantown factory renovation: the buff stone SEPTA Wayne Junction station a block away. .

“Imagine being able to roll out of bed, hop on the train, and be downtown in minutes, to jobs in the area — or to the airport or the 30th Street train station,” Weinstein said. “You can go anywhere from here.”

SEPTA has spent $31.5 million to preserve the Frank Furness-designed station in hopes of spurring development and attracting more riders to southern Germantown, a 19th and early 20th century industrial center that had suffered from decades of neglect. The project was completed in 2015.

On March 1, the first tenants are expected to move into the Autograph Apartments, the latest project amid ever-increasing investment in the neighborhood, much of it led by Weinstein and his company, Philly Office Retail.

“Public transit is the reason we’re here,” he said.

Six regional SEPTA rail lines serve Wayne Junction station, as well as the Route 75 trackless streetcar and two bus lines, the 23 and 53.

Wayne Junction is one of the newest and most prominent examples of transit-oriented development in the region. Typically, this approach relies on zoning changes and design requirements such as reducing parking requirements to build dense, walkable communities with commercial amenities near transit stations.

“Transit-oriented development is really kind of ingrained in our region’s DNA simply because so much of it evolved before the advent of the age of the automobile,” said said Andrew Svekla, manager of smart growth programs for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.

“Our extensive rail network is truly one of our greatest assets,” he said.

However, development patterns changed after World War II, with a move toward suburban single-family homes and a growing reliance on the automobile. Parts of many cities suffered from deindustrialization and blight.

On the other hand, urban neighborhoods now offer opportunities for more compact neighborhoods as consumer tastes and public policies have changed again.

In Philadelphia and the four suburban pass counties, 677 multi-family residential developments were built from 2010 to 2021 — 62% of them within half a mile of a rail transit station, according to a database of commercial real estate data cited by Svekla.

READ MORE: Lansdale exists because of the railroad. Now these leads may be the key to his future

Forty-three of the region’s 250 municipalities have ordinances allowing denser development around transit stations, with varying standards, said Karin Morris, director of community planning for the DRVPC. She also noted that it can be difficult to disentangle government efforts to encourage transit-oriented development and what happens naturally due to market forces.

“There is a growing demand for what we could say as less car-dependent lifestyles,” Svekla said.

Wayne Junction station straddles the border between Germantown and Nicetown, and both neighborhoods benefited. In 2012, the Nicetown Community Development Corp. spearheaded the creation of 87 affordable housing units in two apartment buildings, with commercial space on the first floor.

Weinstein and his Philly Office Retail partners have developed nine buildings since 2016, investing more than $17 million in the Wayne Junction Historic District of Germantown. Most are commercial spaces, as well as the new apartments of the former factory of Max Levy Autograph Co., a manufacturer of precision printing equipment.

Rent from studios to two-bedroom apartments will range from $817 to $1,629 per month, a price aimed at moderate-income workers, Weinstein said.

The former Blaisdell Pencil Factory at 137 Berkley St., redeveloped in 2020, is home to Deke’s Bar-B-Que and Attic Brewing Co., a craft beer maker with a bar and beer garden and a growing reputation on the beer scene in Philadelphia. Attic also hosts live music, brings a variety of food trucks, and hosts a Saturday farmer’s market.

by Merzbacher of Germantown, an old-fashioned bread bakery, occupies the ground floor of a renovated warehouse at 4530 Germantown Ave. since 2019. Upstairs is Philadelphia woodworkinga manufacturer of custom cabinetry and furniture that also does finish carpentry.

» READ MORE: Interior design and home improvement companies have evolved to meet demand during the pandemic

Weinstein said he plans to invest more than $30 million in two upcoming projects. First, a historic renovation of the Arguto Oilless Bearing Co. plant into a cafe with offices is set to begin in March.

And construction will begin in the fall for Wayne Junction Diner Apartments, a six-story building with 143 units and commercial space on the first floor and basement. It is expected to be completed in 2024. The apartments are to be built on a large vacant lot next to Deke’s and the Attic Brewing Co.

Weinstein said he believes the housing will connect the other elements of the neighborhood, although some are concerned about construction disruption and increased traffic.

“We don’t want Wayne Junction to be hot,” Weinstein said. “We want slow and steady growth. We are not trying to change the character of the community.

Before restoration began in 2012, Wayne Junction station was a run-down mess. Windows were boarded up, the north entrance to the station was closed due to a collapsed roof, stairs and facades were collapsing, and rainwater was pooling in passenger tunnels.

Built in 1881 and renovated in 1900, the station had been a stopover for, among others, the Crusader train from Reading Co. to New York and the Royal Blue Express from Baltimore & Ohio to Washington. The B&0 ceased to offer passenger service there in 1958.

Wayne Junction’s facelift restored the passenger tunnels and stairways, while adding new signage, lighting, elevators and high-level platforms that make it accessible to people with disabilities.

Allia Lateef, an economics teacher at Penn Wood High School in Lansdowne, grew up in the area and remembers Germantown as a vibrant neighborhood. She rode on her grandfather’s shoulders at parades.

When she bought a house and moved in 2014, the Wayne Junction neighborhood was full of empty and rundown brick factories, empty storefronts and shuttered homes.

“You can start to feel like you’re being left behind,” Lateef said.

Now, she says, more people are on the streets – not yet as walkable as her ideal, Paris, but looking up.

“These factories are beginning to have life. When I turn around the corner on Berkley Street, it’s such a peaceful feeling to see lights on, faces in the windows,” Lateef said. When his daughters come to visit, they sometimes hang out at Deke’s or Attic Brewing.

Lateef said she viewed the development as positive, but worried that longtime residents could possibly be evicted.

“We have people texting and putting postcards in mailboxes offering to buy houses for cash,” she said. “It’s very blatant. Having the train station, the area seems like a good bet for investors.

In 2021, homes in the Germantown ZIP code that includes the historic Wayne Junction neighborhood sold for between $50,000 and $600,000, with a median price of $210,000 — up 33% from 2019, according to Bright MLS. In 2015, the year the station renovation was completed, the median home price was $100,000.

While the development offers opportunities for the neighborhood, it also has potential downsides, said Emaleigh Doley, executive director of Germantown United CDC, who grew up a few blocks away.

“So many activities going on at the same time can be worrying for people – it introduces change,” she said.

With about 25% of Germantown residents living in poverty, she said the new apartments would likely be out of reach for many. Streets in the area near the Roosevelt Freeway and I-76 are jammed with traffic and the city hasn’t improved sidewalks in decades, Doley said.

Bakery owner Pete Merzbacher, 32, had outgrown his old location in Olney and moved the business to Germantown in 2019, in love with the natural light and Weinstein’s offer to outfit the bakery and to factor the cost into their rent.

When the pandemic hit, the company lost many of its wholesale customers in the restaurant industry, so Merzbacher turned to supplying 75 grocery stores with fresh, local bread, as well as offering pizzas on Fridays and Saturdays.

“I didn’t think Wayne Junction would get a lot of foot traffic, and I don’t need it for my business, but I’m surprised how much that’s changed already,” Merzbacher said.

He also fell in love with tree-lined Germantown and got a house about seven minutes from the bakery.

“It’s not for everyone, you have to compromise to live in Germantown,” Merzbacher said. “There’s not a ton of nightlife. I have no choice of 15 bars within walking distance. But if you favor trees and architecture over access to bars, it’s perfect.

And he loves people. “It’s a good crew here, a good atmosphere.”

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Gabrielle Union-Wade, Dwyane Wade on Family’s Janie and Jack Line – WWD https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/gabrielle-union-wade-dwyane-wade-on-familys-janie-and-jack-line-wwd/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 05:05:17 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/gabrielle-union-wade-dwyane-wade-on-familys-janie-and-jack-line-wwd/ Janie and Jack, the children’s clothing brand, collaborates with the Wade family (such as Gabrielle Union-Wade, Dwyane Wade and their three-year-old daughter Kaavia) on a spring 2022 collection. The Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack collection is inspired by Kaavia herself and designed in partnership with her parents. The collection was created for girls […]]]>

Janie and Jack, the children’s clothing brand, collaborates with the Wade family (such as Gabrielle Union-Wade, Dwyane Wade and their three-year-old daughter Kaavia) on a spring 2022 collection.

The Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack collection is inspired by Kaavia herself and designed in partnership with her parents. The collection was created for girls and boys, ranging from six months to 18 years old, following Janie and Jack’s recent expansion into the tween category in 2021.

“We originally became Janie and Jack fans when we started getting gift packages from Janie and Jack before we even announced that she [Kaavia] was here,” Union-Wade, 49, said of how they came together.

“When the presents started coming in, there was a lot of Janie and Jack, and we loved it. When she was born and we put her in, and washed her, that’s when the rubber took over. road,” she said. Some other brands were cute but couldn’t survive laundry, while “Janie and Jack could survive multiple washes” and never lost their shape or colors. When Janie and Jack approached her about doing a collaboration, the actress immediately said yes.

A look from the Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack campaign.
courtesy.

Wade, basketball star and retired businessman, added: “We’ve been fans of Janie and Jack for years and are thrilled to have collaborated with them on this collection. The colors and patterns seen everywhere bring a certain joy and perfectly embody our very own Kaavia James. It was a true collaboration where our vision as parents of a three-year-old child came to life.

The offering, which includes shorts, tops, dresses and polo shirts, features African-inspired floral prints and bold rainbow stripes, paired with accessories such as bucket hats and socks. Among the details of the collection are French terry fabrics, three-tiered ruffles and crochet details. Retail prices range from $10.50 to $74, and the 41-piece collection is available Wednesday at Janieandjack.com and Janie and Jack retail stores. Select pieces will also be sold on Saks.com.

Gabrielle Union-Wade, Dwyane Wade on Family's

An image from the Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack campaign.
courtesy

They have been working on this collection for a year and a half.

“We wanted to do it right. We wanted to make sure we were all on the same page and our values ​​aligned. Sometimes everything happens organically for a reason, and like-minded people come together,” she said.

According to Union-Wade, she and Wade started with a vision board that expressed what they thought. “We took him [Kaavia] her life, her interests, her friendships, the joys she has and the things that interest her. What does it mean to be a young black girl in a world where anything is possible? We wanted to create that joy and magic that includes everyone. What might that look like? »

When they found all of their favorites, they pointed to Kaavia and asked her what she liked. “We showed him the materials we wanted to use. There were things she didn’t like and they’re not in the collection. We looked at what she triggered, the things she pointed out, the things she didn’t want to take away,” she said.

Since Kaavia was three years old, just starting potty training and going to school, simple designs were important, Union-Wade said. “She needs to be able to put it on and take it off, and if she can’t get her teacher’s attention, we need to make sure her clothes are accident-proof,” she said. She called the line “edgy” with the patterns, crochet and three-tiered ruffles, but said it had to be practical.

Gabrielle Union-Wade, Dwyane Wade on Family's

An image from the Kaavia James-Wade x Janie and Jack campaign.
courtesy.

Union-Wade said that look reminded her of a story about how she met Alicia Keys. “I was in this dress the first time I presented at this big awards show, and I had to go to the bathroom before I presented on stage, and I couldn’t get the snaps back on. together. And Alicia was in the bathroom, and I said, ‘I’m a huge fan, can you help me put this back together?’ Union-Wade said.

She said Kaavia’s best friend is Crosby Sparrow, the son of actress Nicole Lyn and entrepreneur Chad Easterling, and they have a BFF collection for Janie and Jack. Kaavia and Sparrow are featured in the ad campaign.

Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack Campaign

A boyish look in the Kaavia James Union-Wade x Janie and Jack campaign.
courtesy

“They love to match. They love when they wear similar things,” she said.

It remains to be seen how often they will collect. “We’ll see how the public reacts and hopefully it will be a long-lasting partnership,” she said.

Asked how they’ll be promoting the collection, Union-Wade said the whole family was photographed for the social media campaign, which will run across all of their social media channels. Her 14-year-old daughter-in-law Zaya Wade will also wear the collection.

“Zaya is all about fashion and uses fashion to express herself. As a member of the LGBTQIA community, she’s all about expression, and now that she’s in high school, she’s discovering herself and experiences different fashions When she expresses an interest in having her own [fashion line], we’re going to run with that,” Union-Wade said. “She is a muse for a number of different designers. She’s a fashion darling.

Janie and Jack is now owned by Go Global Retail, a brand investment firm, which acquired the brand from Gap Inc. last April. Previously, Janie and Jack, which was founded in 2002, was owned by Gymboree. Gap paid $35 million to buy Janie and Jack’s assets in 2019.

“The Wades have been incredible supporters of Janie and Jack over the years, allowing us to be a part of so many special family moments. Their passion, purpose and exceptional eye for fashion have always been an inspiration” , said Vanessa McClure, creator of Janie and Jack, “With this partnership, we hope to celebrate friendship and style through a world imagined by Kaavia James.”

Union-Wade added, “The colors and patterns perfectly encapsulate the personality of our ‘Shady Baby’ Kavia James…”

“Shady Baby” is also the name of Union-Wade and Wade’s New York Times bestselling children’s picture book, which was published last May.

FOR MORE STORIES:

In Second Memoir, Gabrielle Union goes even further

Gwyneth Paltrow and Gabrielle Union come true about motherhood, mental health and weight gain

Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade launch the Baby range

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NFL players wear their hearts under their uniforms https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/nfl-players-wear-their-hearts-under-their-uniforms/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 05:01:07 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/nfl-players-wear-their-hearts-under-their-uniforms/ When Odell Beckham Jr. returned in September for his first game with the Cleveland Browns since tearing his anterior cruciate ligament nearly a year ago, he had options for his warm-up gear. The flamboyant receiver has been one of the most stylish players in the league for years. He wore a $190,000 Richard Mille watch […]]]>

When Odell Beckham Jr. returned in September for his first game with the Cleveland Browns since tearing his anterior cruciate ligament nearly a year ago, he had options for his warm-up gear.

The flamboyant receiver has been one of the most stylish players in the league for years. He wore a $190,000 Richard Mille watch to a game in 2019, and this season he’s donned custom cleats and gloves by Chrome Hearts, a luxury fashion line whose items can sell for thousands of dollars.

Knowing his pre-game warm-ups would likely require a few minutes of camera time, he chose his outfit carefully, eschewing high-profile branding for a white t-shirt that featured a collage of images of Jarvis Landry, l Beckham’s close friend and teammate at Louisiana State and Cleveland, who suffered a knee injury just prior to Beckham’s return.

Beckham’s shirt – which was indeed captured by the cameras – was designed by Bruce Thompson, a New Orleans native like Beckham, whose custom designs have become a popular way for star NFL players to self-identify. show love before dressing up in their uniforms.

Thompson, who is now the general manager of his own clothing brand, grew close to the Beckham family after meeting Beckham’s father, Odell Sr., when he returned to New Orleans for high school after spent three years in Texas because of Hurricane Katrina. He graduated from Miller-McCoy Academy and earned a scholarship to play catcher at Langston University, an NAIA program in Oklahoma.

Although Thompson declared for the 2017 NFL Draft, he was not selected. After a tryout with the New Orleans Saints didn’t result in a roster spot, he turned his attention to fashion, though he and Beckham still practice regularly in the offseasons.

“He couldn’t necessarily achieve his dream of being in the NFL, and that’s something he put a lot of hard work and dedication into,” Beckham said. “You see a guy who is a really great human being and working hard to find a way to make his way. I will always support that.

Thompson launched her Dreamathon clothing brand in January 2021, at first selling only socks emblazoned with her logo — a stick figure reaching up to a star — and motivational quotes. But that all changed after Beckham’s t-shirt request.

In the match following his return in September, Beckham again turned to Thompson, wearing a black version of the same Landry jersey. In late October, Vikings defensive back Cameron Dantzler, a native of Hammond, La., wanted to say hello to team captain Patrick Peterson, who was injured before an upcoming game. Dantzler reached out to Thompson to create a kind of sartorial recovery message, with images of Peterson in his Vikings and LSU uniforms pasted together. And Bengals wide receiver Ja’Marr Chase showed his love for his quarterback – and former LSU teammate – Joe Burrow by wearing one of Thompson’s creations under his jersey in the team’s first playoff game in January. .

It didn’t take long for players with no Louisiana connections to call Thompson – he said in an interview earlier this month that “hundreds” had contacted him after seeing his posts on social media or mentioned by other players. Thompson’s designs evoke a retro 1990s aesthetic – each features a collage of bold, colorful images and fonts – though each gamer’s request is tailored to their interests.

Some players ask Thompson for a Thursday jersey before a Sunday game. Others may look for one a month in advance, before meeting a particular opponent or celebrating a milestone or inspirational figure. Some solicit them for their off-pitch wardrobes or as gifts.

Thompson runs the business while continuing to train as a free agent player, funding production out of his own pocket.

“For me to just sit and try to explain how I do it, I really don’t know,” Thompson said, adding that he hasn’t had a full night’s sleep since October.

The NFL’s strict rules regarding in-game attire don’t leave much room for customization, aside from a few pre-selected social justice messages players can wear on the back of their helmet, or the few tweaks that can be made to gloves and crampons. But the rules governing what players wear during warm-ups are more relaxed, and Thompson’s t-shirts have become a staple for stars looking for a way to support their peers.

Two days after Beckham’s relationship with the Browns soured and the team released him Nov. 5, Dantzler and Vikings wide receiver Justin Jefferson, another LSU alum, wore Dreamathon shirts scrawled with ” Free Odell” in a white chalk font.

Deebo Samuel and Brandon Aiyuk of the San Francisco 49ers wore matching jerseys with pictures of Wes Welker, their position coach and former New England Patriots wide receiver, ahead of the Dec. 19 game. The following week, Samuel and at least four teammates sported t-shirts emblazoned with images of their head coach, Kyle Shanahan, from his playing days as a receiver in Texas.

Shortly after former Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas was found dead at his home in December, Thompson made a t-shirt for Los Angeles Rams linebacker Von Miller, who had been close friends with Thomas. in the eight seasons they played together on the Broncos. Miller, who wore the jersey before a January game, said he views Thompson’s work as a way for NFL players to publicly express their admiration for one another.

“We all know how long it took to get to those moments,” Miller said, referring to the work players put in to get to the pros. “You do all these things to play some time on Sunday, and we all respect that whether we win or lose.”

Thompson has begun to envision a future that capitalizes on his brand cache, and he hopes to collaborate with the NFL, other sports leagues, and designer brands in the future. Although he declined to say if players paid him for his gear, he is selling a limited amount of shirts online to the public for $60, as well as socks and accessories that are selling out fast enough that counterfeit versions of his shirts started appearing for sale on other sites.

“I’ve always had wild dreams,” Thompson said. “It just rubbed off, and that same passion I had for football, I just put it in there.”

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1 man dead, another seriously injured in overnight shooting on Scott Dr in Hampton – WAVY.com https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/1-man-dead-another-seriously-injured-in-overnight-shooting-on-scott-dr-in-hampton-wavy-com/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 12:33:03 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/1-man-dead-another-seriously-injured-in-overnight-shooting-on-scott-dr-in-hampton-wavy-com/ 1 man dead, another seriously injured in nighttime shooting on Scott Dr in Hampton News / 1 hour ago Video JMU erases 23-point deficit and stuns William and Mary in OT News / 8 hours ago Video Students and families line up for the COVID-19 vaccine at Hampton High School News / 10 hours ago […]]]>

1 man dead, another seriously injured in nighttime shooting on Scott Dr in Hampton

News /

JMU erases 23-point deficit and stuns William and Mary in OT

News /

Students and families line up for the COVID-19 vaccine at Hampton High School

News /

Norfolk Police are looking for a missing 72-year-old man

News /

Man sustains life-threatening injuries, suspect in custody after stabbing at Hampton Target

News /

$1.8 million in funds to reduce homelessness in Hampton Roads

News /

Governor Youngkin signs executive actions banning critical race theory, appointing new parole board, ending school mask mandate and vaccine mandate for state employees

News /

North Carolina governor and response officials urge residents to prepare ahead of weekend storm

News /

Northam declares state of emergency ahead of winter weather forecast; Hampton Roads to see the rain

News /

Hampton Roads takes center stage as Youngkin administration takes office

News /

Winsome Sears, Virginia’s first woman of color to hold statewide office, sworn in as lieutenant governor

News /

Jason Miyares, sworn in as Attorney General, makes history as first Latino to hold statewide office in Virginia

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The southern end of Stamford, Connecticut: master plan with luxury rentals and plenty of pets https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/the-southern-end-of-stamford-connecticut-master-plan-with-luxury-rentals-and-plenty-of-pets/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:00:17 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/the-southern-end-of-stamford-connecticut-master-plan-with-luxury-rentals-and-plenty-of-pets/ Over the past 13 years, the South End of Stamford, Connecticut, a 322-acre peninsula on Long Island Sound, has gained more than 4,000 new rental apartments, most in luxury skyscrapers. Part of a mixed-use development project called Harbor Point, the apartments have helped inject new energy into an area once filled with decaying industrial sites […]]]>

Over the past 13 years, the South End of Stamford, Connecticut, a 322-acre peninsula on Long Island Sound, has gained more than 4,000 new rental apartments, most in luxury skyscrapers. Part of a mixed-use development project called Harbor Point, the apartments have helped inject new energy into an area once filled with decaying industrial sites and brownfields.

Aakash Patel, 27, moved from his 400-square-foot Manhattan studio to a one-bedroom apartment in Harbor Point’s newest apartment building, Opus, last September. Mr Patel, vice president of a venture capital firm, said he searched for a bigger apartment in New York City, but ultimately decided it was not worth the price since he was working from home for several days. per week.

“I also saw that a lot of my friends who were previously in the city were not coming back,” he said. “It became evident that there was not as much of a social or professional benefit for me to be in Manhattan proper.”

Mr. Patel pays about $ 4,200 per month for a corner unit overlooking the Strait. While not cheap, he said, similar views and amenities, including a concierge and spa, were unattainable at this price point in Manhattan. “Stamford was a good first step, given its proximity to the city and the fact that Harbor Point felt quite busy given the concentration of commuters,” he said.

By Shakiban, 78, chose Harbor Point as a convenient location to downsize his Bedford, NY home. He already had a deep connection to the South End, having run an Italian restaurant, Eclisse, for 26 years until it closed in 2016. He still runs European-style cafes, called Patisserie Salzburg, in Rye, NY and New Canaan. , Connecticut, as well as its new location at Harbor Point.

He and his partner have lived in their two-bedroom apartment at the Beacon for about four years. Harbor Point is certainly just a “stopover” for some tenants, but “we have a lot of people who make Harbor Point their home,” Shakiban said. “It’s a great neighborhood to live in and the accommodations are first class.”

But developer Building and Land Technology’s ongoing transformation of the South End has also angered some longtime residents who live in the modest multi-family homes around Harbor Point. Years of seemingly uninterrupted construction – with the dust and noise associated with it – and the emergence of one luxury skyscraper after another feels like a takeover to some.

Building and Land has done most of the development in the area, including the construction or redevelopment of 14 apartment buildings and over two million square feet of office space. Another building with 180 units is under construction.

“It’s not the same neighborhood feeling it has when I first came here,” said Marlene Rhome, who owns a two-family home and has lived in the South End for 43 years. “Don’t get me wrong, it’s good that they’ve done a bit of development. It was acres and acres that were bare. But it’s got to the point now where it’s just ridiculous.

She and other residents are trying to get the city’s approval from a local historic district commission to protect the historic structures that remain in the area.

Directly below Interstate 95 and Stamford Station, the South End is a jumble of repurposed factory buildings, bodegas, turn-of-the-20th-century multi-family homes, new high-rise apartment buildings, small restaurants and pocket parks. Once cut off from the rest of Stamford, the district is now better connected to the city center, where development has moved south even as construction in the South End has moved north, said Ferrarone, co-president of Building and Land Technology.

The development boom has dramatically increased the population over the past decade, to around 7,500. Businesses are also moving in – Charter Communications, the Internet and cable service provider Spectrum, recently opened a new headquarters on Washington Boulevard near the train station.

Another newcomer is a glass and brick building on the eastern shore of the peninsula. Called The Village, the 133,000-square-foot waterfront building is anchored by Wheelhouse, a media, marketing and investment business platform founded by entrepreneur Brent Montgomery in 2018. A restaurant in service Full operates downstairs and Cisco Brewers of Nantucket operates a beer garden during the summer months.

Rob Lia, president and legal counsel for Wheelhouse, said the company relies on the building’s industrial-style interiors and fittings to attract some of the local talent now coming to New York.

Among the newer small businesses in the South End is Third Place, a renovated factory on Pacific Street that allows people to work and drink coffee, meet over craft beers, or host private events. The owners of Half Full Brewery, in the Waterside section of Stamford, came up with the concept, in part as a way to help create a sense of community, said Conor Horrigan, the brewery’s founder.

Rents at Harbor Point average $ 1,974 for a studio; $ 2,568 for a one-bedroom; $ 3,699 for a two-bedroom; $ 5,905 for a three bedroom; and $ 27,500 for a four-bedroom penthouse, according to information provided by Building and Land Technology.

The inventory of multi-family homes and condos is very limited – none were on the market in early January. The median selling price of the six multi-family properties sold over the past two years was $ 522,500, according to data provided by Aida Pedroza, an agent for William Pitt Sotheby’s. Four condos sold last year, with a median price of $ 341,875.

A Co-ownership of 23 units currently under construction on Washington Boulevard will provide homeownership opportunities for households at or below 50 percent of the region’s median income. (For a four-member household, the income limit is $ 75,900.) The project involves the restoration of a historic, three-family Victorian farmhouse. Sixteen units are already booked, with prices ranging from $ 240,000 to $ 310,000, said Joan Carty, executive director of the Housing Development Fund, the non-profit developer.

Since most of the buildings in Harbor Point are pet-friendly, dogs are almost as numerous as the people on the sidewalks and the waterfront promenade. Commons Park, in the middle of Harbor Point, has a dog park, playground, and coffee kiosk.

The waterfront is teeming with boaters, scheduled events and a water taxi service in the summer. The Ponus Yacht Club has a dining clubhouse and a waterside terrace.

At the foot of the peninsula, Kosciuszko Park has a circular hiking trail, ball fields and a playground.

Harbor Point can “look like a bubble at times,” as the areas around it “have received less love,” Patel said.

South End students attend Springfield Elementary School, Kindergarten to Grade 5; Dolan Middle in grades 6 to 8 and Stamford High School. SAT scores for the 2018-19 class (the state’s latest available data) averaged 492 in evidence-based reading and writing, and 484 in math, compared to state averages of 514 and 500.

The Academy of Information Technology and Engineering is an inter-district magnetic high school in Stamford. Admission is based on an application and lottery system.

The independent School by the water has approximately 150 students from Kindergarten to Grade 5. Enrollment is limited to low-income students and tuition is covered by private donations, said David Olson, the school’s executive director. The acceptance rate is around 20% and around 80% of current students are from Stamford.

“We work hard to be good neighbors in the community,” said Mr. Olson. “Every day, when the school lets out, the neighborhood children come to use our soccer field. We try to share our resources.

The journey to Grand Central Terminal on the New Haven Metro-North Line takes approximately one hour from Stamford Station. A round-trip ticket costs $ 23 to $ 30.50, depending on the time of day, and a monthly pass costs $ 335.

Driving to Midtown Manhattan on Interstate 95 takes one to two hours, depending on traffic.

In 1892, George Blickensderfer, a resident of Stamford, received a patent for his design of a typewriter much more portable than the bulky machines of the day. Its South End plant has grown into one of the largest typewriter manufacturers in the United States, according to ConnecticutHistory.org. In 2020, Building Land and Technology dismantled part of the vacant factory, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is currently working on a redevelopment plan.

For weekly email updates on residential real estate news, sign up here. Follow us on twitter: @nytrealestate.

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Bargarh cement factory manager’s 9-year-old son rescued after kidnapping https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/bargarh-cement-factory-managers-9-year-old-son-rescued-after-kidnapping/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 03:24:40 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/bargarh-cement-factory-managers-9-year-old-son-rescued-after-kidnapping/ A nine-year-old boy who was allegedly kidnapped by two disbelievers on a bicycle outside his home in Cement Nagar in the ACC settlement in the town of Bargarh on Sunday evening was rescued by local residents hours after the incident. Mohammad Muazzam, class 3 student and son of Jamil Akhtar Khan, general manager-responsible for CSR […]]]>


A nine-year-old boy who was allegedly kidnapped by two disbelievers on a bicycle outside his home in Cement Nagar in the ACC settlement in the town of Bargarh on Sunday evening was rescued by local residents hours after the incident.

Mohammad Muazzam, class 3 student and son of Jamil Akhtar Khan, general manager-responsible for CSR at ACC Bargarh cement factory, was kidnapped by two unidentified people while playing outside his house around 6:45 p.m. yesterday, according to a complaint. dropped off at Bargarh town police station.

Muazzam’s father mentioned in his complaint that the kidnappers also left a handwritten note in English near the garage of his house in which they demanded a ransom of Rs 10 lakh to free his son.

Based on the complaint, the city police formed squads and launched a search operation to locate Muazzam.

A few hours after the incident, Muazzam was fortunately spotted by local young people near the Bargarh high school. They contacted his parents and informed the police about the case.

Informing the media of the incident, PK Mishra, Additional SP for Bargarh, said: “After receiving the complaint, we blocked all exit and entry routes through town. In addition, we also carried out raids in several suspicious locations. We believe that the kidnappers left the child near the school to escape police vigilance. We hope to catch the kidnappers soon.

Sanjit Chhatria, who reportedly rescued Muazzam near the school, said: “At around 11:30 pm, my friends and I were walking near the school when we saw the boy walking alone near the school boundary. We were aware of the news of the kidnapping and without wasting any time we immediately rushed over to the boy to check if he was the same child. Our concerns were well founded and we contacted the police and returned the little boy to his parents. I also asked the child where the kidnappers had dropped him off and he told me that two men had left him some distance from the school, ”Chhatria added.

Relieved Muazzam’s mother, Sainda Khan said, “He (Muazzam) said two men forcibly took him by bicycle into a jungle. We have no enmity with anyone and I never thought this would ever happen to us.

Muazzam’s state of health is good however, the child is in shock and will recover soon, the child’s family have informed.


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Greater Morristown Weekend Sneak Peek: Hanukkah, Harvey, and Decorated Halls https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/greater-morristown-weekend-sneak-peek-hanukkah-harvey-and-decorated-halls/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 11:00:44 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/greater-morristown-weekend-sneak-peek-hanukkah-harvey-and-decorated-halls/ There aren’t enough hours in a weekend to take advantage of all that Greater Morristown has to offer this weekend. Gift markets, plays, dance performances, comedies, dreidel 3D specs, Santa Claus… you will need a scorecard to chart your entertainment options. And There you go ! Scroll down for more details. Check out our practical […]]]>


There aren’t enough hours in a weekend to take advantage of all that Greater Morristown has to offer this weekend.

Gift markets, plays, dance performances, comedies, dreidel 3D specs, Santa Claus… you will need a scorecard to chart your entertainment options. And There you go !

Scroll down for more details. Check out our practical schedule for even more activities and add your own events, too much.


THURSDAY, DEC. 2, 2021:

Chabad of Morristown and the Rabbincal College of America will feature music, donuts, ‘3D dreidel glasses’ and entertainment by the Hoopwizard after lighting up the giant menorah on Morristown Green. It all starts at 5.30 p.m. For more information, call 973-307-0195 or email here.

Morristown United Methodist Church will hold a “Blue Christmas Service” at 6 pm, “to mourn the losses and sorrows of the year”. Everyone is welcome. At 50 South Park Place. A recording of the service will be posted on the church’s website Friday.


FRIDAY, DEC. 3:

Santa will take requests from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Christmas Festival at Morristown Green. Photos with Santa Claus cost $ 10. In the activity tent, Preschool Advantage will host Snowflake and Sock Snowman Crafts. Presented by the Morristown Partnership, the festival runs until December 19.

The Shakespeare Theater in New Jersey presents his first Holiday Bazaar2 p.m. to 8 p.m., and again Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at its Thomas Kean Theater Factory, 3 Vreeland Road, Florham Park, 973-845-6789.

Macculloch Hall Historical Museum and Hall of Acorns in Morristown are joining forces today (candlelight tours, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.) and Saturday (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) to Terrace the rooms. A $ 25 ticket purchases admission to both museums, which are adorned with the splendor of a Victorian vacation. Thomas Nast’s most famous Christmas scenes will be on display at Macculloch Hall; hear Christmas carols on the Acorn Hall Chickering 1872 grand piano. Pre-registration, masks compulsory. Four Morristown restaurants offer discounts to Deck the Halls patrons. Macculloch Hall is at 45 Macculloch Ave. Acorn Hall is at 68 Lafayette Ave.

A community nursery exhibit takes place from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and continues from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday at Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 283 James Street, Morris Township, (973) 539-4030.

Morristown High School Theater present Harvey at 19 ‘o clock. Tickets: $ 8- $ 15. At the MHS Auditorium, 50 Early St. Masks are required. Rescheduled from November, due to the pandemic shutdown. More performances on Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

The folk project weekly Troubadour series present Night of the choir song at 7:30 p.m. at the Morristown Unitarian Fellowship in Morris Township. Admission: $ 10 at the door, $ 10.50 online; live broadcast, $ 2.99. Proof of vaccination required for the live performance; no children under 12 (until they are eligible for vaccination). At 21, route des Hauteurs de Normandie.


SATURDAY, DEC. 4:

Macculloch Hall Historical Museum and Hall of Acorns in Morristown together present Halls Bridge, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. See the Friday entry to learn more about these festive tours.

The Shakespeare Theater in New Jersey presents his first Holiday Bazaar, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. See the Friday entry for more details.

The Christmas Festival at Morristown Green continues, with tours and photos of Santa Claus ($ 10) from noon to 7 p.m., and these activities:
Activity tent
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. – Macculloch Hall Thomas Nast Ornamental Coloring Activity
4 p.m. to 5 p.m. – Mayo Performing Arts Company – Favorite Holiday Songs
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. – Create your own Santa bag craft
Outside
2 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Miniature train rides

The New Jersey Youth Symphony presents classical concerts at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the Dolan Performance Hall at Saint Elizabeth University in Morris Township. Tickets: $ 15 to $ 20. At 2, chemin du convent.

The Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms at Morris Plains presents a Crafts-Mas Open House in the Log House and a Crafts-Mas Pop-Up Shop at the Educational Center, from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. At 2352 State Route 10, 973-540-0311.

The 11th annual Christmas market in the Assumption parish operates from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. in Morristown. Fifteen vendors will offer African crafts, note cards and prints produced by photographers, watercolor artwork, wooden crafts, hand-painted silk scarves, clothing knit and crochet outdoor and baby items, new or nearly new housewares and gifts; plus a 50/50 raffle and lots of homemade Christmas goodies. The profits go to two African charities based in Assumption: The Village Angels of Tanzania, which employs at-risk local youth to make weekly food deliveries to poor and isolated elderly people; and Africa Surgery Inc., which brings together doctors and patients in Sierra Leone for life-saving therapies. At Rauscher Hall, 91 Maple Avenue. Free parking behind the church. Also on Sundays from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Morristown Mayo Performing Arts Center present A Magic Circus Christmas, at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets: $ 29- $ 69. Masks, proof of vaccination or recent negative COVID-19 test required for ages 12 and over. At 100, rue Sud, dial 973-539-8008.

Morristown High School Theater present Harvey at 19 ‘o clock. See the Friday entry for more details.

Carolyn Dorfman Dance present Backstage Pass – A happy return to live dance, at 7:30 p.m. at Madison Community Arts Center. Tickets for the place with limited space, $ 20 for adults and $ 10 for students. The interactive and narrated program includes excerpts from PRIMA !, explore the music of Louis Prima. Proof of vaccination, masks compulsory. At 10 Kings Road, 908-687-8855, ext 1. The Sunday night show is sold out.


SUNDAY, DEC. 5

The 11th annual Christmas market in the Assumption parish ends, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. See the Saturday entry for more details.

Morris’s Winter Farmer’s Market is back for a ninth season, in a new location: Convent Station in Morris Township. It is open from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Sunday until March 27, 2022 (except December 26). More vendors, more space and more free parking, sponsor promises Grow it green Morristown.

The Christmas Festival at Morristown Green continues, with tours and photos of Santa Claus ($ 10) from noon to 7 p.m., and these activities:
Activity tent
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. – Making greeting cards for the Goryeb Children’s Hospital
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Move & Groove with Miss Jolie!
Outside
2 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Miniature train rides

New Jersey Branch 75 of the National League of Ukrainian Women of America presents a 2 p.m. talk in Whippany by the Canadian professor. Lubomyr Luciuk, who will discuss two books: How people live in Soviet Russia, impressions from a trip (reserve a copy) and Refund Operation, on Soviet disinformation regarding Judeo-Ukrainian relations in the post-war era. Admission: $ 20. At the Ukrainian American Cultural Center in NJ, 60 North Jefferson Road.

Morristown High School Theater present Harvey at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. See the Friday entry for more details.

New Jersey Youth Jazz Symphony Orchestra will perform at 3 p.m. at Dolan Performance Hall at Saint Elizabeth University in Morris Township. Tickets: $ 15 to $ 20. At 2, chemin du convent.

The New Jersey Youth Symphony and Jazz Orchestra

Pastor Sidney and Teresa Williams of Bethel Church AME in Morristown will be honored at 4 p.m. for their Table of hope popular soup. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will present to the couple their Light up the world room at 283 James Street, Morris Township.

Morristown Mayo Performing Arts Center present A Forever Motown Holiday Celebration at 7 p.m., with former members of The Four Tops, The Temptations, The Marvelettes, and more. Tickets: $ 29- $ 69. Reprogrammed since last December. Masks, proof of vaccination or recent negative COVID-19 test required for ages 12 and over. At 100, rue Sud, dial 973-539-8008.

At 7:30 p.m. on New Jersey Baroque Orchestra presents a online replay of his concert on November 14, featuring music by Franco Moro, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann and a staging of Bach’s Coffee Cantata

The 7:30 p.m. performance of Carolyn Dorfman Dance to Madison Community Arts Center Is exhausted; try calling 908-687-8855, ext. 1, for any cancellation. See the Saturday entry for more details.



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🌱 Huntington Passes Budget 2022 + Opening of the Brazilian Steakhouse https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-huntington-passes-budget-2022-opening-of-the-brazilian-steakhouse/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 01:33:00 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-huntington-passes-budget-2022-opening-of-the-brazilian-steakhouse/ Happy Monday, Huntington! Let all of you know what’s going on locally to start today on an informed note. First of all, the weather forecast for the day: Partly sunny. High: 45 low: 29. Here are the best stories in Huntington today: ICYMI: Fogo de Chão sets the opening date for Huntington station. Fogo de […]]]>


Happy Monday, Huntington! Let all of you know what’s going on locally to start today on an informed note.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Partly sunny. High: 45 low: 29.


Here are the best stories in Huntington today:

  1. ICYMI: Fogo de Chão sets the opening date for Huntington station. Fogo de Chão has set its opening date for December 6. The Brazilian steakhouse will be located at Walt Whitman Stores right next to Cheesecake Factory. Fogo de Chão uses the age-old art of churrasco: roasting high quality, simply seasoned pieces of meat over an open flame, each carved and carved next to the table by gaucho chefs. The name of the restaurant translates from Portuguese as “fire on the ground”. (Huntington Patch)
  2. Huntington Town adopts budgets for next year. The City of Huntington has adopted its budget for 2022. The budget has increased by 2%, from $ 208.2 million to $ 212.8 million. The 2% increase is the highest allowed by New York State. (Press day)
  3. ‘White Christmas’ Theater Review at Engeman Theater – Long Island Theater And Book Review. Thanksgiving is over and the holiday season is in full swing. What better way to spend an evening by going to Northport and seeing “White Christmas” at the Engeman Theater. ‘White Christmas’ runs from now until January 2. Tickets can be purchased by calling (631) 261-2900, online at www.EngemanTheater.com, or by visiting the Engeman Theater box office at 250 Main St., Northport. (smithtownmatters.com)

today Huntington Daily is brought to you through Newrez, one of the nation’s leading mortgage lenders. Make a smart move for your future and refinance with Newrez today. Call 844-979-1707 to get in touch with a Newrez loan officer. Newrez, LLC (NMLS # 3013)


Huntington Notebook

  • Halesite Fire Department: “Our TREE SALE begins on Friday 12/3 at noon and will continue until Sunday 12/5🎄🌲🎄🌲🎄🌲.” (Facebook)
  • St. Dominic Elementary School – Oyster Bay: ” Hello ! Today we begin the Advent season where we prepare our hearts to welcome Christ again at Christmas. Throughout these next four weeks, ask God to help you eliminate everything in your life – all suffering, all sin, all fear – that. .. “(Facebook)
  • St. Dominic High School – Oyster Bay, NY: “We are back from Thanksgiving and our daily visits to college continue.” (Facebook)
  • Cold Spring Harbor Library and Environmental Center: “Discover this week’s programs! “(Facebook)

From our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

  • Save 15% On All LLBean Wicked Good Slippers – For A Limited Time (November 29)
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You are now in the know and ready to go out this Monday. I’ll be in your inbox tomorrow with a new update! If you resent these newsletters, consider inviting some of your friends and neighbors to read them. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Andrew Tessler

About me: Hi! My name is Andrew and I have lived in Huntington for 7 years. I have lived in other countries and states, and my number one love is Huntington. I love the health and wellness, travel, stand up paddleboarding, and of course, going to restaurants and events all over Huntington!

Got a tip or suggestion for an upcoming Huntington Daily? I’m all ears. You can reach me at Huntington@Patch.com.


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Inside the fight to save Bulgaria’s last narrow gauge railway https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/inside-the-fight-to-save-bulgarias-last-narrow-gauge-railway/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 20:56:17 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/inside-the-fight-to-save-bulgarias-last-narrow-gauge-railway/ Dressed in a floral-patterned tunic and baggy pants, her hair covered in a colorful scarf, Sabie Djikova loaded a dozen bottles – 45 pounds of milk – into a backpack and handmade bag, the hoisted onto her narrow shoulders and walked down the unpaved road to the nearby train station. At 65, she wears less […]]]>


Dressed in a floral-patterned tunic and baggy pants, her hair covered in a colorful scarf, Sabie Djikova loaded a dozen bottles – 45 pounds of milk – into a backpack and handmade bag, the hoisted onto her narrow shoulders and walked down the unpaved road to the nearby train station.

At 65, she wears less than before. “When I was younger I could carry up to 40 pounds,” she said – almost 90 pounds.

Sabie and her family are part of a small community of Pomaks, Bulgarian-speaking Muslims who have lived for hundreds of years in a remote mountainous region of the country. Like others in her village, Sabie owns a few dairy cows, which she milks every day before dawn.

For more than 20 years, Sabie has made the daily commute from her village of Ablanitsa near Tsvetino station, where a small train then transports it about 30 minutes to the village of Velingrad. There, she goes from house to house delivering bottles of fresh unpasteurized milk. Other women from Ablanitsa sell their products, including cheese, yogurt and honey, in the Velingrad open market.

The little money sellers earn helps support their intergenerational families. None of their business would be possible without the train, which is the most convenient way for them to get their goods to market.

I first met Sabie in 2019, when, on a trip with friends, I saw her – among a group of traditionally dressed Pomak women – get on the train in Velingrad. After talking for a few minutes (my friend Ogy Kovachev translated), I got the idea to photograph his daily rituals to show how important the train line is to the villagers who depend on it to sell their products.

Ogy, who often took the train for sheer pleasure and loved buying milk from Sabie, helped me get in touch with her, and I plan to come back to photograph her soon. But between the pandemic and my obligations to teach photojournalism, our meeting was delayed by almost two years.

Finally, last May, my Bulgarian husband and I took the train to Ablanitsa. The village is home to a few hundred people who live along the dirt roads on a steep hill. From the top of the village you can breathe in the fresh mountain air and see clearly across the valley to the nearby peaks of the Rhodope Mountains. There used to be a carpet factory here, as well as a school and a medical clinic, but it’s all gone now. There are no shops or restaurants. The only public building is a small mosque which was locked when I walked past.

Sabie greeted me with a warm hug. His adult son, Musa, brought chairs into the yard, and his daughter-in-law followed, carrying glasses of homemade ayran and a huge jar of blueberry juice. (The Pomaks are known to make products from the wild blueberries they harvest.) Musa showed us the barn that houses two cows, a calf and a horse. He also showed us the rest of the small farm, where the family raises rabbits and chickens.

Although modest and a little shy, Sabie finally agreed to let me photograph her daily routine. Following her gave me a better understanding of how important the train is to local residents.

The Rhodope Narrow-Gauge Railway serves 27 stations across the Rhodope mountain range. Built in the first half of the 20th century, the railway has a track that is 760 millimeters wide, or about 30 inches, or about half the width of a standard track. (The narrow track is great for climbing steep terrain and allows for tighter curves, lighter rails, and smaller tunnels, all of which are essential to its route through the mountains.)

At one time, dozens of narrow-gauge train lines crisscrossed Bulgaria, helping to connect small villages with important trading towns. After the collapse of communism, ridership declined as large numbers of villagers migrated out of the countryside. As the country suffered from economic crises, the Bulgarian National Railways divested in narrow gauge lines.

Today, the Rhodope Narrow-Gauge Railway is the last of its kind in the country. But its sustainability is threatened. At one point, the track conditions were so bad that the train was moving painfully slowly. “You can walk alongside at the same speed or faster,” said Ivaylo Mehandzhiev, 27, a member of the non-profit group Za Tesnolineikata, which means “For the narrow way”.

Starting at Septemvri station, the northern terminus of the line, the track follows the course of the Chepinska and Ablanitsa rivers. It crosses a picturesque gorge until it peels off and goes up a wooded slope, making a hairpin turn followed by a spiral and then an eight. It continues to climb towards the village of Avramovo. (At 4,157 feet, Avramovo is the highest station on the Balkan Peninsula; it offers an unobstructed view of the snow-capped peaks of Pirin Mountain.) From there the track descends to the ski resorts of Bansko and Dobrinishte. In total, the trip covers 78 miles, takes about five hours, and costs 6.60 Bulgarian Lev, or about $ 4.

Sabie only pays 54 Bulgarian Lev ($ 32) for a retiree’s quarterly pass, making it a very affordable form of transportation.

The railway has long been threatened with closure. The ridership is low. Maintenance costs are high. In recent years, newly constructed asphalt roads have made it easier to travel between villages in the region for those with a car.

Yet the railroad provides a valuable and affordable service for many local residents. “The train gave our community access not only to education, but also to jobs and hospitals,” said Fatima Ismail, who grew up in Avramovo and as a teenager took the train to go to high school. And it contributed to the teenage romance, she said, blushing as she remembered a boy who would take the train from Tsvetino and meet her at the station.

It has also created local jobs. Fatima’s cousin, Mehmet, was station manager and two other cousins ​​were engineers.

Kristian Vaklinov, now 26, was a teenage train enthusiast when in 2014 he first learned that the government was considering shutting down the Rhodope Narrow-Gauge Railway. He responded by organizing and circulating a petition to save the train line. To his surprise, he collected over 11,000 signatures in just 30 days.

With friends like Ivaylo, he formed Za Tesnolineikata, the nonprofit organization; its objective was to save the train by increasing ridership on the line, mainly through tourism.

“The train has a social function, ”Kristian explained to me. “It belongs to the people and it is our national treasure.

In order to attract tourists and increase ridership, the group created a website where they posted train times, photos and a history of the line (in both English and Bulgarian). They set up a museum in one of the stations and filled it with old photographs and historical artifacts. Special event trips are organized on holiday weekends and people can book a special train ride for their wedding.

This year, to mark the 100th anniversary of the initial construction of the railway line, the group organized a special trip between Septemvri and Velingrad, with five wagons pulled by an old coal-fired steam engine. Folk singers performed along the way; the cars were full of tourists and train enthusiasts.

Despite the line’s popularity, concerns remain about its future. In particular, the new paved roads lead some to wonder how long the train will continue to run. While some locals are happy with the new roads, others, including women like Sabie who don’t drive, continue to take the train.

Sabie and the others who travel to Velingrad daily may be the last of their kind. “The older women work very hard,” said Hatije Mircheva, a 58-year-old resident of Ablanitsa, who also sells dairy products at the Velingrad market. But the younger generation? They have other priorities, other routines, she says.

And yet young train enthusiasts, including members of Za Tesnolineikata, may be the rail line’s only hope for survival. In fact, they’re already planning a celebration in five years, in 2026 – with singers and dance groups at each station.

“We hope to continue operating until then,” said Ivaylo.

Jodi hilton is a Boston-based photojournalist and documentary photographer. You can follow his work on Instagram and Twitter.



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Hallsville-Centralia, Harrisburg-Fayette Highlight of District Semifinals https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/hallsville-centralia-harrisburg-fayette-highlight-of-district-semifinals/ https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/hallsville-centralia-harrisburg-fayette-highlight-of-district-semifinals/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:28:59 +0000 https://coachfactoryoutlets2014.com/hallsville-centralia-harrisburg-fayette-highlight-of-district-semifinals/ Hallsville head football coach Justin Conyers knew how important the Indians’ game against Centralia was earlier this season. The Panthers beat Hallsville last season in the last second, and the Indians were eager to put that behind them. This led to a 46-12 win on September 3. Hallsville then took his revenge. On Friday, Harrisburg […]]]>


Hallsville head football coach Justin Conyers knew how important the Indians’ game against Centralia was earlier this season.

The Panthers beat Hallsville last season in the last second, and the Indians were eager to put that behind them. This led to a 46-12 win on September 3.

Hallsville then took his revenge. On Friday, Harrisburg and Centralia can get their revenge at the most important moment. The Panthers will face the Indians and the Bulldogs will face Fayette, with trips to their respective district championships on the line.

It won’t be an easy task for either team, especially Centralia, despite a significant rebound from the start of the season 1-3.

“The stars may have to align perfectly for us to be successful,” Centralia coach Tyler Forsee said. “I am excited about the opportunity.”

The opportunity for Centralia exists thanks to the Panthers improving this season. Hallsville also got to see this firsthand last week.

The Indians were able to spot Centralia in the Panthers’ victory over Montgomery County last Friday, and Hallsville saw a much more physical team than they faced earlier this season. That was Centralia’s goal.

“They looked so much sharper than they looked at the start of the season; they looked physical,” said Conyers. “They have definitely improved throughout the season.”

Following:Tolton High School’s best football season in 5 years ends, but not before we instill promises

This puts the blame on Hallsville. The Indians are undefeated and will play in front of their home crowd. Centralia knows what it’s like to wrestle, but the Panthers’ resurgence has given them new life.

Conyers knows this gives Centralia an advantage.

“We’re kind of in a lose-lose situation where all the pressure is on us,” Conyers said. “They are going to go out and play football without pressure.”

Conyers said his team’s lose-lose situation means Hallsville can’t waste any time. The Indians need to bring physical play to Centralia instead of waiting for the Panthers to gain momentum.

Forsee knows his team needs to do the same, and he’s keenly aware of the task at hand. Hallsville might be the best team overall, but the Panthers just need to be the best team for a Friday night.

“We have the underdog and we are going as far as possible,” said Forsee. “I said

put it on the line. Right now we’re sort of playing with house money. It’s a game that most people exclude us from. Let’s go do it. “

Following:How Battle High School football’s Gerry Marteen always made an impact as a senior while on the sidelines

Harrisburg's Tanner Lanes (12) passes the baton to Gavin Curtis (17) against County of Scotland on October 15.

In Boone County, Harrisburg will play a game similar to Centralia.

The Bulldogs do not dwell on revenge on a Fayette team that inflicted Harrisburg their first loss of the season 42-26 on October 8. There’s enough motivation to be had just with the playoff atmosphere itself.

“It’s the playoffs and our nearby rival,” Harrisburg coach Steve Hopkins told the Tribune in a text message. “It doesn’t matter who we play from last week, maximum effort of concentration and practice and application of what we teach is required.”

Hopkins said there will be few adjustments in what Harrisburg will do this weekend. There won’t be any crazy changes to what the Bulldogs are throwing at Fayette. Instead, Hopkins wants her team to focus on correcting the mistakes they made the last time around.

He wants Harrisburg to properly adjust to Fayette’s formations and movements while seeing the offense have a healthier balance between running and passing play.

“We will continue to build on the fundamentals of blocking and tackling,” said Hopkins. “There is, however, a greater urgency in everything we do, and it has been a good week so far balancing urgency with attention to detail.”

Following:Football Districts: Battle, Centralia and Harrisburg advance to playoffs on October 29

Running back Tay Patrick stiffened a Liberty (Wentzville) player in the Spartans' 43-18 win last Friday night.

The battle surrenders to Holt

The Spartans are the only Columbia team remaining in the MSHSAA playoffs, and they have history on their side this week.

The battle is 5-0 against Holt. However, the past does not affect the present.

This season, Holt is an immaculate 9-0 and will host the Spartans 5-4 for a district title playing spot on Friday.

The Indians average 48.1 points per game and allow just 13 points per game defensively. Holt has four wins against teams with at least seven wins this season.

Yet believe it or not, Battle seems to have a better chance of playing on the road than playing at home. The Spartans are 3-0 on the road this year, compared to 2-4 at home.

The battle will likely need a quick offensive start, along with a few timely turnovers in defense to stand a chance.

Chris Kwiecinski is the sports writer for the Columbia Daily Tribune, overseeing sports coverage for the University of Missouri and Boone County. Follow him on Twitter @OchoK_ and contact him at CKwiecinsk@gannett.com or 435-414-3261.


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